Thursday, May 12, 2022

1969 Corvette "AstroVette" Stingray Apollo-Themed

 

1969 Corvette Stingray AstroVette

This Corvette you're looking at was built specifically for the Astronaut Alan L. Bean. There were only two others made just like this for two other Astronauts, Richard Gordan Jr. and Charles "Pete" Conrad Jr. All three men were shipped into orbit on the Apollo 12 Mission in the second Lunar Module to land on the Moon.

NASA and General Motors

In the '60s and early '70s, NASA astronauts were like rock stars in America. Reaching the Moon before Russia was something America did that helped bring a divided country together after the controversial Vietnam War.

GM president, Ed Cole, saw the potential of linking the NASA program to the GM brand for product growth. GM already gave astronaut Alan Shepard, the very first man to break his way into space, a new white 1962 Corvette with a custom space-age interiorand had also done business with astronaut legends like Niel Armstrong and high-performance enthusiast, Gus Grissom.

1962 Corvette

Of course, it's hard to imagine GM giving away Corvettes, but Cole's decision to do so, according to his widow, Dollie (Chairman of the National Corvette Museum and Vice Chairman of the National Air & Space Museum), made sense to Cole. "The astronauts were incredibly visible," she says. "And good publicity is good publicity." But putting astronauts in Corvettes wasn't just for publicity. "Who more worthy than guys who represent our country?" says Dollie. "They were literally risking their lives. Space travel today isn't 'ho hum', but people perceive it that way. There were so many unknowns then. The cars were a way of saying 'Thank you.'"

Executive GM Lease Program For NASA 

Eventually, GM would see big benefits from being affiliated with NASA, so they went ahead and started an executive lease program for NASA employees. If you qualified for the lease program, you could lease a GM vehicle for $1 for one year. According to astronaut Alan Bean, most qualifying employees chose Corvettes, making it an interesting sight to see when you drove past the Space Center and looked in the parking lot. 

Apollo 12 Astronauts With 1969 Corvette

Those Who Fly Together, Drive Together
All three astronauts that boarded the Lunar Module for the Apollo 12 Mission were very close, and all were car guys in their own respect. They became good friends with Jim Rathman, a Chevrolet and Cadillac dealership owner who was also known for winning the 1960 Indy 500. 


Jim's dealership was located in Melbourne, FL, and its close proximity to the Space Center is what made the friendship between the three astronauts and others in NASA like Niel Armstrong possible. With "Pete" Conrad Jr., Gordan Jr., and Bean successfully completing the Apollo 12 mission, they all decided they should get matching Corvettes with some special visual upgrades to distinctively separate them from the rest of the Corvette owners and lessees.


Rare Riverside Gold Corvette Color

It just so happened, in 1969, Corvette was offering a one-time-only Riverside gold exterior color for the Stingray. The three astronauts joined forces with friend and dealership owner, Jim Rathman, who helped aid in getting all three gold Corvettes to his dealership.

No one really knows where the black "Wings" were painted on the Riverside gold base paint, but it wasn't at the factory or at Ratham's dealership. As the story goes, the three astronauts took a lot of time to decide on what design they wanted to go with before settling on the black "Wings." 

AstroVette 1969 Corvette

1969 Corvette "AstroVette"


Ratham decided to get his friend involved, Alex Tremulis. Tremulis was an industrial designer who held automotive design positions at Cord Automobile, Duesenberg, General Motors, Tucker Car Corporation, and Ford Motor Company before later establishing a consulting firm.

Tremulis and Ratham both did have a hands-on part in the design. Ratham placed the white stripe that separates the black and the gold colors, and Tremulis designed and painted the special red, white, and blue logos on the fender. 

1969 Corvette Stingray


The Special Red, White, and Blue Emblems and The Meaning

The red, white, and blue emblem represent what you would think - America, the American flag, and NASA. Each emblem had a different set of initials drawn out on a certain color of the emblem representing the Corvette owner's rank during the Apollo 12 Mission. Bean’s LMP initials were placed on the blue tag signifying him as the Lunar Module Pilot. Pete’s initials of CDR were on the red tag of the emblem, which stood for Commander, and Dick’s initials of CMP, for Command Module Pilot were drawn on the white tag of the emblem. 

The colors the initials were painted on also represented the color each astronaut used to label their belongings during the Apollo 12 Mission.


396 cu. in. engine

Corvette "AstroVette" Spec.

  • 427 CU.-IN. Big Block L36 

  • 4-Speed Manual Transmission

  • 490 Horsepower - 460 lb.-ft. of Torque

  • Four-Barrel Rochester Carbrator

  • Hydraulic Four-Wheel Disc Brakes

  • Fully Independent Suspension

  • Optional Side Exhaust Selected But Not Installed

  • Performance: 0-60 mph 6.0 Seconds; Quarter-Mile 14.3 at 93 MPH

  • One-Year-Only Riverside Gold

  • Special Steel Wheel Covers

  • Curb Weight: 3450 lbs.


1969 Corvette "AstroVette"

Where Are The Iconic "AstroVette" Stingrays Now?

Out of the three 1969 Stingray "AstroVette" Corvettes that were delivered to the Ratham dealership for the crew of the Appollo 12 Mission, only one is known to exist. 
Alan Bean's Corvette is the last AstroVette that is known to exist. It was turned in after the $1, 1-year lease was up. In 1971, it showed up in Austin, TX on a GMAC car lot. It went up for auction, where a space enthusiast by the name of Danny Reed put his bid in. He initially lost the auction, but the original winner could not come up with the money, and Danny eventually won the "AstroVette."

Making the "AstroVette" Perfect

The Stingray "AstroVette" was put on track to be restored to its original state to save its integrity, which meant no full restoration. Danny Reed worked with many Corvette experts throughout the process to get it back to its original look - the way it would have looked when it came right off the assembly line with overspray in the correct spots and everything. 


The National Corvette Restoration Society (NCRS) has given it many awards at some of the most prestigious Corvette car shows in the world. 

It has been on display at NASA events, the National Corvette Museum, the Kansas Cosmosphere, Flordia Space Center, Johnson Space Center, Houston Space Center, in Washinton, and many other worthy places. 

Alan Bean has since been reunited many times with his now-famous "AstroVette." Bean has become a painter since his days of walking on the Moon. A lot of his painting work has to do with space and his moonwalking, as he writes, “Our time on the Moon ended much too quickly and, in the years since then, I have created paintings to try to capture the feeling of our Apollo 12 mission, as well as all the other Apollo missions, too. It’s my hope that these paintings will help other people share in the great adventure." 


Astronaut Alan Bean

How to Tell If You Found One of The Lost "AstroVette" Stingrays?

Just like all rare cars, there are some imposters out there, but there is a way to tell if you found a real "AstroVette." Only these three Corvettes in the lease program were special ordered and registered in the lessee's name. This featured Corvette has a tank sticker that says, “Courtesy car delivered to Alan L. Bean.” If found, the other two would have a similar tank sticker with the corresponding astronaut's name - Richard Gordan Jr or Charles "Pete" Conrad Jr. All other Corvettes for the NASA executive lease program were put in the military's name.

AstroVette 1969 Corvette

There is nothing like a little Corvette and NASA history! The $1, 1-year executive lease program for the astronauts ended in 1971. Whether or not it was because the Space Program became less popular and the executive lease program was less worth it from an advertising standpoint, I'm not sure. But there was a time there for a while when being an astronaut was better than being a Hollywood star or a pro-athlete.    

Sunday, May 1, 2022

1982 Buick Grand National: History, NASCAR, And '80s Performance

 1982 Buick Grand National


Although almost everyone you ask will tell you, there is no such thing as a true Buick Grand National that was not all "Black", the fact is, they'd be wrong! 

They might also tell you there's no such thing as an '82 Grand National, that would also be wrong! The first Grand National was actually born in 1982; it was charcoal grey and silver and has a pretty cool little story to it.

The Birth Of Something That Would Soon Become A Legend 

Back in 1981, Buick took to the main stage at NASCAR with their G-Body Regal. A few Regals made their debut in California at the Riverside International Raceway. But it was in Daytona, the second week of the season, where the tides changed for the Regal and set the way for Buick and the G-Bodies in NASCAR for quite a while. 



Richard Petty Wins Daytona 500 In A Regal

For a record-setting 7th time, Petty takes the checkered flag, but this time in a Buick Regal. This win broke a long drought of 16 years since someone drove across the finish line at a NASCAR event in a Buick. It was last done by Herb Thomas, who did it in 1955 in a '55 Buick Century. 

Record-Breaking Year For Buick In NASCAR 

Throughout the season, a Buick Regal would cross the finish line first in 22 out of 31 events with just five different Buick DriversPetty, Boddy Allison, Ron Bouchard, Cale Yarborough, and Darrell Waltrip. In the end, Waltrip would bring home the championship title for his team and Buick.

These efforts brought the NASCAR Manufacturing title home to the Flint, Michigan plant that had been pumping out those Regals since 1978. 

The new sporty image and the accomplishments at NASCAR that followed prompted Buick to take full advantage of the newfound "This Isn't Your Grandma's Car" image and run with it. 

1982 Buick Grand National Flyer


In December 1981, Buick announced that a "Special Edition" Regal was going to be unveiled in the first week of the NASCAR season. This just so happened to be the first time the Daytona 500 would be set for the first race of the season, and is now a staple in NASCAR racing to this day. The Daytona week is like the Super Bowl of NASCAR and prime time for anything special, especially for automotive manufacturers that want to show off something new. 
 

Buick And NASCAR Copyright Issues

Buick went ahead and already named their "Special Edition" Regal the "Grand National", the only problem was that NASCAR already had the copyrights to the nameNASCAR Winston Cup Grand National Seriesso NASCAR sued. After some legal wrangling, Buick kept the name but changed the nameplate to the recognizable one everyone knows todaya big turbo-6 on the right side of the emblem, the words "Grand National" stacked on top of each other, and a checkered flag on the left side of the emblem. 

1982 Daytona 500

Daytona 500 Week 1982

Now whether or not the Grand National was ever actually unveiled at the 1st Daytona week, no one seems to really remember. Many think it never made it, largely because of the ongoing legal dispute with NASCAR, but regardless, the "Special Edition" prototype GN was done. 

Not only was the Grand National project moving forward for Buick, but on Feb 14, the day of the Daytona 500, 25 of 42 cars lined up as Buick Regals, and 7 of 10 of them were in the top 10 positions. The race ended just about the same way it started, with Allison winning in his Buick Regal, followed by three other drivers driving Buick Regals. The success continued for Buick throughout the season, and so did production on the Buick Grand National. 

1982 Buick Grand National


1982 Buick Grand National: What Was Special 

Was the first Buick Grand National fast? By today's standards, not at all! In fact, most soccer Moms' crossovers would take the '82 Grand National out pretty easily. But in 1982, it's sad to say; this V6 would beat most factory V8s on the road, at the same time looking cooler than most of them.

When I say V6, you're probably thinking of the turbo 3.8-liter that Grand Nationals are known for, but this first GN was a little different. The '82 Grand National came with a 4.1-liter V6 that ran through a 4-barrel quadrajet carburetor naturally aspired. This fun combination would get you a whopping 125 horsepower and 205 lb.-ft. of torque. 

1982 Buick Grand National Engine


There were a few buyers out there that had inside information about the soon-to-be-famous 3.8-liter turbo engine combo, and checked the right boxes on the order sheet. This combo would get the buyer 175 horsepower and 290 lb.-ft. of torque.

Heading Off For Special Treatment 

All soon-to-be Grand Nationals rolled off the assembly line as normal Buicks and then were shipped off to Cars and Concepts in Auburn Hills, MI, where they received their Grand National treatment. They were all done in Charcoal Gray exterior paint and grey interior but weren't all based on the same Regal. Some base Buick Regals were sent to Cars and Concepts, but so were some Limited and Sport coupe Regals. So for a collector on the hunt for a legitimate one, there are a few different real options out there (do your research). 

1982 Buick "Grand National" Special Edition Upgrades  

  • 215 made plus on prototype
  • 4.1-liter V6 naturally-aspired or (roughly) 20 3.8-liter V6 turbocharged
  • 125 horsepower (4.1) or 175 horsepower (3.8 turbo)
  • 205 lb.-ft. of torque (4.1) or 290 (3.8 turbo) 
  • Automatic transmission
  • Heavy-duty engine and trans coolers
  • 3.23:1 rear gear (4.1) or 3.03:01 (3.8)
  • F41 Grand Touring Suspension

   1982 Buick Grand National Interior


Cosmetic Upgrades
  • Silver stripe in the middle of the charcoal grey paint (hand-laid) red pinstriping separating the Colors (hand-laid) 
  • Big Buick letters on the back quarter panels and on the back decklid lip

  • Blacked-out grille and headlamp door covers
  • Special Edition rally wheels w/Buick center caps
  • Front bucket seats w/black leather inserts throughout the whole interior
  • Leather-wrapped steering wheel
  • Center console w/shifter
  • Special Grand National gauge cluster 
  • Special Grand National badging on exterior and interior

1982 Buick Grand National Gauge Cluster

It's hard to find these cars in good shape. One of the biggest problems they had was through the years, their lack of power left a lack of enthusiasm to keep them running and looking good. The usual rust invades the lower doors and quarter panels in the usual places, and their interiors are commonly faded and torn from sun damage due to T-tops (some had sunroofs instead).  

But these Grand Nationals can still be considered collector items thanks to their history and the lack of numbers produced. You could say they started a mid-to-late-'80s revolution of more desirable cars for the auto enthusiast, not to mention they paved the way for the '80s most famous muscle car, the 1986 and '87 Grand National.   

1982 Buick Grand National


How Expensive Were They?

The Grand Nationals weren't as expensive as buying a Corvette, but spending extra cheese on a Buick was something people didn't do much of since the muscle days. With a Regal sticker price of $8,702, you would have to cough up another $3,278 for the Grand National packages and about another $1,000 more if you ordered the turbo 3.8-liter version. With America in a recession at the time, that was a lot of money, and Buick's most expensive styling and performance package it ever sold. 

1982 Buick Grand National 

All and all, if you found one in good shape, it would be worth buying a 1982 Grand National just to preserve it. And if you found a 1983 Grand National, I have a bridge to sell you because there were no Grand Nationals made in '83. 

Sunday, March 27, 2022

2009 Corvette ZR1: The Era’s Most Pinnacle American Sports Car

2009 Corvette ZR-1


Corvette ZR1 Comeback


Corvette has always made a big splash with their Z-Series sports cars. Badass Vettes such as the ZO6, ZR1, and the ZL1 would receive more power and torque, handling capabilities, and all-around upgrades for better track performance than any other vehicle General Motors was pushing on the market at the time (expectation '14 and '15 Camaro Z28). 

Chatter started around 2007 about a new version of the ZR1, a ZR1 that would be so performance packed it would give it a supercar status that would have its name mentioned in the likes of Ferrari, Porsche, and Lamborghini. 

This first 2009 ZR1 was auctioned off for a Million bucks to a one, Dave Ressler. He is also the owner of the oldest known Corvette in existence, #003. 



6.2-liter LS9


Motor and Transmission

6.2-liter LS9 aluminum V8 with a Twin Vortices Series supercharger and a top-loaded intercooler is what powers the ZR1. Hand-built in Wixom, Mi., this powerhouse motor puts out 638 horsepower at 6500 rpm and 604-lb.ft. of torque at 3800 RPMs.

Sure, nowadays there are some stout performers that make more horsepower and torque, but not 13 years ago. 

Controlling all this power is easy with a close-ratio six-speed manual gearbox and a high-capacity, high-performance clutch that makes anyone sitting in the driver's seat feel like they are driving a professionally-built race car. 

Performance Stats

This General Motors engine and transmission combination is responsible for the staggering numbers that it puts down while going in a straight line. This ZR1 gets from 0-60 in 3.4-seconds while reaching 100 mph in a matter of 7-seconds. The Corvette has no problem covering the quarter-mile in 11.3 seconds at 131 mph. With a top speed of 200 mph, without a doubt, this was the most capable, powerful Corvette put into production.  

Frame and Suspension

The ZR1 comes standard with an aluminum frame structure that weighs in at a mere 138 pounds. This frame is the exact frame that is used on the C6.R race car, giving it a power-to-weight ratio of 5.2 pounds per horsepower. 


The aluminum frame rides on a Magnetic Selective Ride Control suspension. The Magnetic Ride Control was the most sophisticated suspension of its kind. This ride control system gives the driver two different driving modes to select, Sport ride-control, which is ideal for the racetrack, and a Touring mode, which is ideal for everyday driving. These modes can be easily switched back-and-forth in the cockpit by the driver with just a push of a button. This may not seem like much of a wow factor today, but back in 2009, this convenience was just starting to become a top technology on American vehicles. 

Tires

With all that power and such a capable suspension, you have to have some way of keeping the tires and wheels sticking to the ground, and in this department, GM spares no expense. When testing the Corvette at the Virginia International Raceway, the stock Michelin tires were eventually replaced with a set of Michelin Pilot Sport Cup tires. With this change, the ZR1 was able to shred a considerable amount of time off of each lap. And that’s when the decision was made, the Michelins that performed the best would come on the best Corvette ever produced.


Corvette ZR-1 Wheels

Braking

You can't have a vehicle with all that power and ability without having an effective way of stopping it. So massive Brembo Carbon Ceramic 15-inch front and 15.5-inch rear vented cross-drilled rotors were added. These rotors can withstand heat of 1000-degrees celsius before warping. The brake system includes six-piston calipers in the front and four-piston calipers in the rear. When this system all works together, it creates the stopping power that you would need for a 200 mph supercar.


Corvettes First Super Car


The Looks Of A Supercar

With a wider stance than the average Vette, the ZR1 is designed to take corners better and get around the track faster. Sporting 19x10-inch wheels in the front and 20x12-inch wheels in the back, the look of the ZR1 says nothing but supercar. All buyers would have had the option to choose the color of the wheels, which include a bright silver coated finish, a deep black coated finish, or a chrome finish. All three colors look great, depending on the look you are trying to achieve. There are nine color options for the exterior finish, all of which are in an exotic tint helping give the ZR1 the supercar look that Corvette is ultimately after. The spoiler on the back is both functional and proportional-looking, and the see-through carbon fiber hood really makes a supercar statement.


Interior Options For The ZR1

Corvette ZR-1 Cockpit
When it comes to the interior, the ZR1 comes with an abundance of options and colors. The buyer was able to request almost everything from the steering wheel to the door panels be wrapped in rich leather. They would also have the option of different model-specific badges to be placed about the inside of the vehicle. Power adjustable heated leather seats with microfiber inserts could be purchased for a better day-to-day driving experience. Corvette also offered a package called the 3ZR. This package included a nine-speaker Bose system, Bluetooth wireless technology, a head-up display, and a SiriusXM satellite radio, all designed for a more convenient and exciting driving experience.

Price Tag And Gas Mileage

With supercar looks, supercar power, and track times to match, this ZR1 puts otherworldly supercars to shame when you compare price tags to performance. When brand new, the MSRP price tag was $112,000.00, which was much cheaper than a higher-powered Farria, Lambo, or a Porsche at the time. The ZR1 also rated very high in gas mileage for a 2009 sports car. With an EPA-estimated 14 city/20 highway mpg, the Corvette did better than most vehicles with that size engine. 


The best thing about the ZR1 is for the first time ever, Americans that were in the market for a supercar cloud finally buy an American-built supercar, minus the outrageous cost of maintenance, luxury tax, and everything else that comes along with owning an overseas supercar.  


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Friday, March 11, 2022

The 2001 Corvette Z06: The First Modern Day Z06

 

2002 Corvette Z06

Unless you've been living under a rock, you know about the extremely potent 2023 Corvette Z06 that is on its way to the market sometime in late 2022. If you want to read about that, just look up any automotive website on the web and you can find out everything you know or you can go to this ride-along video/article with top engineers on the project, written by me for Muscle Cars & Trucks (C8 Corvette Z06 Engineers Share Untold Details On New Supercar: Video.


1963 Corvette Z06

1963 Corvette Z06

Since we all should know everything about the new Corvette Z06, I decided that we should take a look back at the birth of the first modern Corvette Z06. But first, let's take a short look at the birth of the very first Z06. 

The first Z06 became available in 1963 and there were only 199 produced and sold. These Corvette Z06's sole purpose was to be sold for road course racing. They came with a 327 cu.in. (5.4-liter) engine, four-speed transmission, a beefed-up suspension, a massive brake system upgrade that included dual master cylinders, and an optional 36.5 US gal (138 l; 30 imp gal) tank.

The thing about these C2 Corvette Z06s was you didn't just go to the dealership and buy one, you had to know someone who knew what boxes to check in the order form if you wanted one of these race-ready (RPO Z06) Corvettes, and just like the 2001 Corvette Z06, you didn't get many luxuries with the car, it was truly for going fast. 


2001 Corvette Z06


2021 Corvette Z06

This Corvette was built to surprise and dominate the market. The Z06 was designed for the track and pushed the boundaries of what was really possible from a production car that could drive to the track, make better times than its competition, and drive back home with the air conditioning kicking and the radio blasting. 

Basic Spec:

  • 5.7-liter LS6 V8
  • 6-speed manual
  • 385 horsepower and 385 lb-ft of torque
  • New FE4 Suspension (four-wheel independent suspension)
  • Bose speaker system
  • Leather bucket seats
  • 17" front and 18” rear rims wrapped in Goodyear Eagle F1 SC tires
  • Hardtop only
  • Brake coolers
  • Curb weight: 3,118 lbs.

  • Gas Mileage: 17 city / 26 highway

Z06 Engine Corvette

Engine And Transmission

The LS6 is essentially a more powerful version of Corvette's LS1 V8. The LS6 engine upgrades start with a redesigned intake manifold with better flowing internal passageways. Reengineered cylinder heads create more flow through the intake and exhaust valves, and the combustion chambers were redesigned to reduce valve shrouding.

All these upgrades led to a higher compression ratio which then led to a redesigned thin-walled cast-iron exhaust manifold system to provide a smoother exit for the combustion escape.

Of course, all this extra flow wouldn’t be worth much without a redesigned camshaft. So a beefier cam was installed by Corvette engineers with more valve overlap and greater valve lift. Chrome-vanadium-steel valve springs and stronger pistons cast from a more durable alloy were implicated in the engine’s design for toughness. And finally, the LS6 was engineered with windows cast into the internal crankcase walls to help air retreat from the underside of the burning hot pistons.

This new engine setup gave the New Corvette Z06 385 horsepower at 6,000 RPMs and 385 lb-ft of torque at 4,800 RPMs, and a redline RPM of 6,500. In between all the power and the rear wheels was a beefed-up clutch (with lighter pedal effort), a larger-diameter driveshaft, and a revised six-speed manual transaxle. This new M12 gearbox was introduced with shooter 1st, 2nd, and 3rd gears to better utilize the new higher-revving LS6. All gears were 10-16 percent shorter except for the 4th gear which remained the same.

Corvette Suspension

2001 Corvette Z06 Suspension

More power always means more changes all around. To accommodate the power of the LS6, Corvette went with a new FE4 suspension that included revised shock calibrations, a stiffer rear transverse leaf spring setup, and stiffer anti-roll bars for the front and rear.

To add ground support, each corner of the Vette receives 1-inch wider tires, bringing them up to 9.5-inch wide in the front and 10.5-inch wide in the back. New custom light-weight 10-spoke wheels were wrapped in Goodyear F1 Eagle tires: 265/40ZR-17s in the front and 295/35ZR-18s rears. The F1 Eagle SC tires were designed with more flexible sidewalls achieved by doing away with the famous run-flat tire design. This permitted a half-degree more negative camber to keep the tread flatter during hard cornering for track use.

To prove the Corvette was built for business, engineers found places around the car where they could shave pounds off the curb weight. Helping save weight was the deletion of the run-flat tire design, mufflers were made from Titanium, and the windshield and rear glass were all lightened to help bring the Corvette’s curb weight down to 3,118 pounds, that's 38 pounds lighter than its original form. A lot of weight was saved in the Titanium mufflers alone, but the weight of the new suspension offset the weight-saving by a lot.  

2001 Cobra R

Step Aside Cobra R

The Cobra R was making some big waves at the track. Performance numbers were pretty impressive, and the Corvette Z06 was Chevrolet's answer to those performance numbers.

The Cobra R and the Z06 were pretty close in performance numbers at the time (numbers for Z06 below). The Cobra R turned numbers out of its 5.4-liter that looked a little like this: 385 horsepower and 385 lb.-ft. of torque (the same as the Z06), 0-60 mph in 4.7 seconds, a quarter-mile time of 13.2 (Ford tested) and 12.9 (Motor Trend tested) with a top speed of 170-mph, and stops from 60-0 in 127-feet.

Although the numbers were somewhat close, the Corvette beat out the Cobra R in other places. The Cobra R lacked air conditioning, an audio system, rear seats, sound dampening, and cruise control. The Corvette also lacked a back seat, but that's because it was never meant to have one, it wasn't a compromise. Also, because of the limited number of Cobra Rs that were built, the sticker price showed $55,5ish, but you couldn't buy one for under $75,000. The Corvette Z06 stuck pretty close to its price tag of just under $50,000 without a lot of limited edition inflation.

2001 Corvette Z06

Let's Go Over Some 2001 Corvette Z06 Numbers 

The 2001 Corvette Z06's proof of superiority is in the numbers. A 0-60-mph time is recorded at 4.3 seconds, and a 70-mph to 0 stop takes only 152-feet. In a quarter-mile sprint, the Corvette can cover it in 12.7 seconds at 113-mph. Hitting a 150-mph will only take you 28 seconds total, while a top speed of 170-mph is easily manageable. Although the top speed does suffer a little bit as the C5 Vettes will hit 175-mph, but that's because of the Z06 closer transmission clutch gear ratios. 

Hitting corners is another place where the Corvette Z06 shows no mercy to its competitors. Pulling .98 Gs in and out of corners is just what this sports car does, and that actually beats out all other sports cars out of there including the Viper GTS and the Ferrari 360 Modena, which are above the Corvette Z06s price bracket by a lot. 


Racing Z06 Corvette

Z06 Performance Built

Making sure everything was performance built was what this Corvette was all about, even both the dual mesh grilles in the front and the rear brake coolers in front of the rear wheel wells are completely functional. 

The 2001 Corvette Z06 is just like the new Z06s, although classified as a sports car, they perform like a supercar compared to their competition.